Thursday, March 31, 2011

Completed Ottoman

So here's a good before and after for ya.

Before:


I got this table several months ago at Goodwill for $10. The legs are what sold me on it. Aren't they the cutest? But when I got it home I noticed this:


Did ya see it? Someone was drinking a little too much while making this table. That back leg is jacked! I still thought it was cute in all its quirkiness and was going to use it in my house but there was one problem...I didn't have a place for it. What we really needed was an ottoman. This table was the perfect size so why not turn it into one? So then it went from looking like this:


To this:


 Mitch just cut off the legs and made a mini-me. 


And here's a free shot of Ry for ya just for good measure.


Okay, two.


When I bought this table, I was seeing it in a glossy black so outside I took it and sprayed those cute little legs.



 With this:


I love the new shiny black paint. It just updates the whole piece. The next step was preparing the foam. A few weeks ago we burned (yeah, I said burned) our former couch. (You can do that in the country. Well...I think you can...) It was old and needed to go, so Mitch dragged it to our neighbor's firepit and lit it up. But before he burned it, I removed the cushions to save for this project. So glad I did. You know how stinkin' expensive foam is? Okay, it's not THAT horrible but we're cheapies and would rather save our moolah for say...dinner and a movie. But this foam is some thick stuff. Check it out.



So ghetto me decides to cut it in half. Yeah, the kind of half that's impossible to cut straight. Unless you're Martha, that is. So we marked it all out and tried our darnest to cut straight.


With a bread knife.


Then an electric bread knife.


Power tools, baby! That's my father-in-law graciously holding the foam while I zip through it with the knife.


Then we sprayed the top with spray adhesive and laid the foam on top. It laid pretty evenly after we stuck a little chunk of foam in a spot that I totally botched with the knife. (I failed you, Martha!)



The foam wasn't big enough to cover the entire top so I cut an extra piece and stuffed the crevice with batting. Problem solved.


Covering it with batting.




Next, Mitch had cut some scrap from a pallet to size and I covered it in batting.


The pain about this project was that we had to line up our fabric perfectly (since it was a geometric pattern) but the table itself wasn't perfect. Remember drunk-o who made it? Well yeah, all the sides were different measurements and nothing was straight. So the finished product isn't perfect but we love it. And seriously how cool is it to tell your friends that you made your own ottoman? I'd take that any day over going out and spending a couple hundred dollars on one. Well that, and I don't have a couple hundred lyin' around.




Mitch attached the sides with screws.


And here's Mitch again adding the nailhead trim which was a super tedious job. Thank goodness for Mitchell cause I don't have patience for stuff like that. His poor thumb is literally black and blue. He had to press the nailheads in before hammering. There's no way I could have done this project without his help. He did all the annoying parts. Thanks, Mitch!




Tufting part = pain in my ain. Actually it wasn't too bad when there were two of us working on it. We finished it last night. I tried the night before by myself but just got frustrated. This is definitely a two person job.



After Mitch pushed the tufted part down, I attached a button on the underside of the table to keep the thread from going through. Easy solution that works well.



And here she is--the finished product! We love it. Perfect scale for our little living room, complete with nailhead trim and tufting. (Ignore the date on these pictures. I did something on my camera. No idea what.)


 


 Again, here's the before and after:



We figured it took us about three hours a night to work on this and we worked on it for three nights. Of course we're no pros, and wanted to do the best job we could so it probably took us longer than it had to. We're really happy with the results and now we can enjoy the fruit of our labor!

*Check out an update on the tufting here.

50 comments:

  1. Love it, Kat!! I'm very impressed. You guys are so creative and resourceful!!

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  2. Wow! It looks fantastic! My friend just had a chair recovered for her nursery, in the same fabric. You really got the buttons pulled nice and tight.. good job!

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  3. Wow I can't believe you did that yourself! Great job! You should send it to one pretty thing and diy showoff for their furniture makeovers.

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  4. Love it!! Great job - I'd say it's pretty darn close to a "Martha" job :-)

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  5. this is so great! Love the black legs and the fabric you chose could work well with just about anything.

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  6. I am so impressed with your creativity and skill. GREAT JOB, I Love it!!!!!

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  7. A-MA-ZING! Love it.

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  8. I love it! It's amazing and does not look like you made it yourself. I'm very inspired now, thanks for posting how you made it!

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  9. This is amazing! I'm book marking it for my files, I have a coffee table that I would love to turn into an ottoman...it might be a little easier than your sidetable.

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  10. THIS is impressive. I love that you took that wonky piece and made it into this fabulous ottoman. I'm going to have to keep my eyes open for a wonky table.

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  11. Fantastic job!I love how you even had a nice straight line in the fabric to follow for nailhead placement :)))

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  12. I am impressed Kat, it looks fabulous!! Your hard work paid off!

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  13. Wow- it looks gorgeous! Great job! I love that you sprayed the legs a glossy black. And the fabric is beautiful! Very well job done!

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  14. Just found your blog and this is an amazing transformation. I'm going to link to it on my blog in tomorrow's post, great job.

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  15. Wow love it what a transformation, love the fabric

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  16. So great I have a table that I plan to do the same thing to. Thanks for sharing and letting me see it actually done!!
    Ronda

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  17. So classy and classic, I love it!

    Suzy xxx

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  18. wow I love it - the fabric is really nice - and so creative of you guys :D
    ps i found you on DIY s-o

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  19. Kat! I love the ottoman! Great job! It looks so professional and way to save on the foam!

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  20. Just saw your blog post on Danielle's blog! Love you DIY! and the fabric choice! Can't wait to start following! www.mcnamaradesign.blogspot.com

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  21. This turned out beautiful, I love it! I hated tufting my headboard last summer, people make it look so easy! I feel your pain :)

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  22. Thank you so much for taking the time to post this DIY! I am going to try this out! I hope it goes as smooth sailing for me, as it looks like it was for you! :/

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  23. Beautiful job, Kat! I shared your project on my blog today, as I'm considering a similar project for one of my interior design clients on a strict budget!

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  24. Uh seriously, this is amazing! AMAZING! I have been wanting to do this with my sofa table to keep kids from bonking heads on it... I love the boards on the side I hadn't thought of that! Anyway, I would love to have you over to Remodelaholic to do a guest post about this project if you are interested please let me know and i will send you the details! Thanks,
    Cassity

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  25. You executed this very well! I love it. I'm keeping this tutorial in mind! Congrats on the features! So glad for you - wish I had been one of the first to notice it! :)

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  26. Crystal D StearnsJune 15, 2011 at 1:42 PM

    LOVE this ottoman! I never thought of covering the sides! (= I am just a little confused on the tufting.... :( do you sew through the table and HOW!? lol

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  27. What a great idea for a re-purposed table, very inspiring! You did a really good job :)

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  28. this is so great! Love the black legs and the fabric you chose could work well with just about anything.

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  29. I am really impressed with your work. It gives me hope. :) I, too, am limited on funds and you're so correct! This would've easily cost $200+ at a store. I'm going to save a couple of old cushings from furniture.

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  30. "Tufting part = pain in my ain." LOL! This is exactly the tutorial I was looking for and the end result is definitely something to aspire to. Thanks! Sara

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  31. "Tufting part = pain in my ain." LOL! This is exactly the tutorial I was looking for and the end result is definitely something to aspire to. Thanks! Sara

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  32. Love the work - it looks beautiful! How long did it take you guys to complete the project?

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    1. Hey Johanna:) I think it took us about three hours per night for three nights--not too shabby when you think of all the money it saved us;) Thanks for stopping by!

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  33. So I just found you via Young House Love, and this ottoman has stolen my heart! I have an old antique rocker that was given to me, and its got some ghetto-fabulous upholstery. I've put off re-doing it for a year now. But you've inspired me! I'll let you know how it turns out. But I know one thing, the hay that is now cushioning my tush will be replaced!

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  34. I love this! I am so inspired. Do you happen to know approximate dimensions? It looks just the perfect size and I'd like to try and duplicate. Thanks!

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    Replies
    1. Hi Lexie--the size is 36 x 17 and about 17" high. Hope that helps!

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    2. Yes it does! Thanks. I was thinking 36 wide too. :)

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  35. Great job! It looks wonderful.

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  36. It's stunning! You did such a beautiful job.

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  37. REally great recycle job! I think that if you tuffed with the buttons b4 you attaced the foam w adhesive it would be doab;e. But I don't always think that far in advance. I would probably not have tuffed it w the buttons. HOWEVER it looks professioanlly done that way. You should be proud!

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  38. I love your finished product. Very creative. I am a little confused on how you tufted it through the wood part and the cushion. Did you pre drill holes? Did I miss something? Thanks!
    LisaE

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    Replies
    1. Hi Lisa,
      Yes, my husband drilled through the table top before we added the foam.

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  39. Beautiful ottoman..you should definitely consider removing that nasty carpet though!

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    Replies
    1. Ha! Funny you should mention the carpet...it's on its way out:) THANK GOODNESS!!

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  40. I have the same table, and it has quite a history. Please see this link:
    http://www.viaconsignment.net/occasional_tables.php#
    In its original condition, it's valued at $600.
    I still love your redo!
    Becksnyc

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    Replies
    1. Hey I'd love to hear more about the table! If you get a chance, email me at kathertzler@yahoo.com. Thanks!

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  41. This is totally awesome! Wow your so talented..so funny because I tried to do something like this but it looks terrible! I am going to follow your instructions and see if I can fix it!

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  42. I love the story behind the adorable ottoman! This cracked me up! I too am a thrifter so I've had many funny experiences like your quirky leg! My kids love making fun of my stories, but they do love our treasures! Great job!

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  43. Hello, I have an unpainted writing table 1850
    s that I just refinished. It looks like the one you described . I will try to send a pic to you. The drawer is finished on the underside too. Bottom of drawer is a solid piece of wood, finished like the rest of the table.

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